Case Histories

Corrosion Control

USS Curtis Wilbur - Naval Base Yokosuka, Japan

Challenge:

This entire ship space is exposed to continuous hot, humid, corrosive environmental exposure during underway operating conditions, causing corrosion damage to all metal surfaces. Lagging on stacks deteriorates rapidly due to exposure to sea and rain water.

Solution:

Hand preparation of excessively deteriorated areas followed by pressure washing all surfaces with Chlor-Rid to remove soluble salts. Apply SE-110-CI Penetrating-Stabilizer and allow thorough drying. Next, over-coat with SE-120 Protective-Skin then topcoat with an optional SE-170 High-Gloss.

NYS Thruway Authority - Yonkers, NY

Challenge:

A clear coating was needed for over 300,000 square feet of metalized steel that would provide long term weatherization protection and was guaranteed not to crack or peel for at least 10 years.

Solution:

The SES-161M was chosen for its excellent adhesion, impact resistance and weatherization qualities, and ease-of-application. Both the metalizing and encasement were done in-concert-with the steel-fabrication

NOTE: Rusted surfaces in pictures are bare steel surfaces not treated as per specification.

St.Paul Water Works - St. Paul, MN

Challenge:

Drain pans in the air handling system at the St. Paul Water Works were corroded and in need of re-coating or replacement. Previous attempts to re-coat these drain pans, which are constantly wet during approximately 6 months out of the year, had been unsuccessful.

Solution:

Following pressure washing to remove dirt, damaged coating and soluble salts, SE-110-CI Penetrating-Stabilizer with Corrosion Inhibitors, was applied to prime the surface for coating. SE-110-CI penetrates into and through existing coatings, re-adhering any loose or flaking coating material, and can be applied directly over rusting surfaces. This coating dries to form a tacky, flexible film, which leads to outstanding adhesion of the topcoat. When thoroughly dry, SE-120 Protective-Skin topcoat was applied, producing a tough, flexible protective hide that provides lasting, long-term protection.


Immediately After Coated

Ice Arenas - Rochester, MN

Challenge:

Two indoor ice arenas that are part of the Rochester Recreational Center have ceilings constructed using cementitious coated pressed wood fiber acoustical panels similar to a well-known product having the trade name “Tectum”. These panels, which sit on purlins and other steel structural members that support the roof above, offer excellent acoustical properties as their construction leaves significant interstitial space. These 1970 era rinks, with the years of dirt collected in this interstitial space, along with a few roof leaks that occurred along the way, and of course the continual source of humidity from the ice and ice-forming system, created a poor indoor air quality state, with unacceptably high counts of stachybotrys and other fungi. From the ice surface one could see the dark yellow and black staining throughout the surface of the panels. Also the structural members were showing their age under such conditions with visible corrosion throughout. The cost of remediation options involving removal and replacement was estimated to be in the millions of dollars, out of the question for this community to bear. A single coat system to seal off the surface of the panels was considered, but abandoned as it utilized a pesticide as it’s means for passing ASTM D3273/D3274, the test for mold resistance of a coating. The inclusion of a pesticide requires specific signage and posting of this fact, plus parental notification to all the school districts that use the facility, also applicators must have current pesticide applicator licenses. Moreover, the use of a pesticide is always accompanied by the potential risk of occupants having allergic reactions, as previous incidents with this particular pesticide (IPBC, iodine containing) have shown. Also this coating system is not designed for metal surfaces, necessitating the use of an entirely different system for the steelwork, making the project logistically more difficult and thus more expensive. For these reasons this alternative was not chosen.

Solution:

SAFE Encasement Systems was chosen for two of the many advantages that it offers, namely the ability to provide a mold-resistant surface without the use of a pesticide, and long-term corrosion resistance without necessitating sand-blasting (see ASTM salt spray and humidity cabinet data showing its appropriateness for use over metal surfaces). All panel surfaces were HEPA-vacuumed to remove loose contaminants, and all metal surfaces were scrubbed with a water solution of Chlor*Rid to remove corrosion-inducing soluble salts. All panel surfaces were sprayed with SE-110 surface stabilizing primer, while all metal surfaces were sprayed with the corrosion inhibited version of this primer, SE-110-CI. SE-120 Protective-Skin topcoat was then spray applied over all metal and panel surfaces. After the project got underway using the aforementioned method, it became obvious that inordinate amounts of encasement materials would be required to achieve a pinhole-free continuous coating over the panel surfaces. A decision was made to spray the panels first with an inexpensive elastomeric block filler followed by the SE-120 topcoat. This minimized the consumption of the more expensive encasement materials and resulted in a remediated facility (final air tests for the presence of mold were negative) for less than 25% of the cost of the removal and replacement option. This environmentally-friendly coating system was installed by Veit Environmental, Inc, of Rogers, MN.

American Crystal Sugar Plant - Moorhead, MN

Challenge:

Early testing of the corrosion-inhibiting primer was carried our at the American Crystal Sugar plant in Moorhead, Minnesota.  Because of the nature of the operations carried out in this plant very high humidity conditions prevail and severe rusting is prevalent throughout many areas of the plant. Three test patches were applied in the summer of 1997 on different types of surfaces. No surface preparation whatsoever was carried out other than the customary pressure-washing of the entire plant that is carried out at the conclusion of a processing season in May. One surface was a badly rusted water pipe, a second consisted of a column integral with an outside masonry wall, and the third was a free-standing column which was the only one of the three test patches were there was significant paint remaining.

Solution:

After observing the performance of these test patches, the first of many projects was completed, again using SE-110-CI primer then SE-120 topcoat. Both coatings were spray applied at 15 mils wft. This environmentally friendly encasement system was installed by Swanson & Youngdale, Inc. of Minneapolis, MN.

Encasement of Light Posts - Kansas City, KS

Challenge:

Steel signal light posts in a Kansas city previously painted with lead-based paint were rusted to the point where consideration was being given to replacement, which has been the practice in the past, but which could not have been accomplished before the onset of winter.The search for alternatives led to a consideration of encasement.

Solution:

A decision was made to encase the posts using SES-110-CI, the corrosion inhibited version of the Penetrating-Stabilizer (primer) and SE-120 Protective-Skin (topcoat)This system passes the relevant ASTM’s for meeting the US-EPA’s definition of abatement via encapsulation for LBP.Because of the corrosion on this metal surface, the first step involves the use of Chlor*Rid in water at 5% in a scrub to remove the soluble salts that are catalyzing the corrosion.Then the SE-110-CI is brush applied at 10 WFT, and allowed to dry to a clear appearance.Then SE-120 is brush applied also at 10 WFT, and allowed to cure.Though the 120 can be tinted to most any color, the customer chose to go over this system with a Sherwin Williams super paint in the desired color.The material costs for the SES portion of this project are in the range of $0.70/sqft, leaving an abated surface relative to the lead and future corrosion substantially eliminated.The cost of encasement was approximately half the cost of replacement and it was accomplished during the desired time frame.Associated Insulation Inc of Manhattan, KS completed this dust-free abatement project to the customer’s satisfaction.

Before

After

 

Before

U.S. Navy Ship - San Diego, CA

Challenge:

The supply air ducts were badly rusting and needed to be coated with a system that could withstand salt spray and high humidity conditions without corroding.

Solution:

The surfaces were sand blasted the treated with Chlor*Rid to remove remaining soluble salts. Next, the surfaces were coated with SE-110-CI, a corrosion protecting primer. When dry, these surfaces were over-coated with SE-120 Protective-Skin coating, then top coated with SE-170 High-Gloss Surface Coating to provide protection from mold and mildew.

Prep (remove soluble salts)

Prime (SE-110-CI)

Protect (SE-120)